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In the News

New research reveals workplace bullying and violence are risk factors for type 2 diabetes

Read this new research by Tianwei Xu from the Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark and her collaborators from Denmark, Sweden and Finland.
For further information contact Dr Xu (tixu@sund.ku.dk).

Study shows that the consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes

Read this new research by Inserm researchers in the 'Générations et Santé' team at the Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des populations (Inserm UMR 1018).
For further information contact Professor Guy Fagherazzi (guy.fagherazzi@gustaveroussy.fr) and Dr Francesca Romana Mancini (francesca.mancini@gustaveroussy.fr)..

Current issue: December 2017

December 2017 cover

Click here to view this month's contents

The cover picture shows a map of the retina; the risk of developing vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy in individuals with diabetes is increased if the first detected microaneurysm (red lesion) occurs within the area bordered by the black line. In the present issue of Diabetologia, Ometto et al report that the location of early retinopathy lesions is predictive of progression of the disease to a vision-threatening stage. They also identify an area temporal to the fovea where the risk of progression was higher than average in individuals with diabetes.

Cover credit: Giovanni Ometto, Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

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Up front

Sally Marshall

Competition for publication in Diabetologia is greater than ever, and less than 20% of papers are accepted. Of all the high-quality papers that appear in this month's issue I want to share with you some articles that I find to be of particular interest. These will be featured 'up front' in the print issue and here on our website. Sally Marshall, Editor


Exercise training response heterogeneity: physiological and molecular insights
by Lauren M. Sparks

There is considerable variation in the magnitude of exercise training responses. In a review in this issue (DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-017-4461-6), Lauren Sparks explains that selecting a response variable a priori is critical and its analytical rigour paramount. Furthermore, the statistical power of the chosen outcome should be assessed prior to classifying exercise responses to ensure that even the subtlest differences in a biologically meaningful outcome can be detected with confidence and investigated more thoroughly to determine mechanisms. The author discusses how both endogenous (inherent and potentially a predictor of the response) and exogenous (environmental and can be manipulated) factors contribute to exercise response heterogeneity and can be exploited to achieve maximal beneficial responses on an individual basis. It is hoped that, as the field of exercise metabolism continues to combine the plethora of -omics data with deep clinical phenotyping of participants in clinical exercise trials, the paradigm will be shifted by allowing exercise prescriptions to be targeted to those most likely to benefit and by identifying novel approaches to treat those who do not. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Chylomicrons stimulate incretin secretion in mouse and human cells
by Arianna Psichas, Pierre F. Larraufie, Deborah A. Goldspink, Fiona M. Gribble, Frank Reimann

Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone that is released in response to food ingestion, to enhance insulin secretion and suppress appetite. In this issue (DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-017-4420-2), Psichas and colleagues show that gut endocrine cells producing GLP-1 respond to chylomicrons, which are formed and released by the intestinal epithelium into the lymph after fat absorption. In a cell line model, chylomicron detection involved partial lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase and subsequent activation of the free fatty acid receptor FFA1, although other, yet to be identified, mechanisms were involved in mixed epithelial primary cultures. Whatever the mechanisms prove to be, this research highlights that, in addition to detecting the presence of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, the gut also generates hormonal signals in response to the arrival of nutrients in the bloodstream. These time- and nutrient-dependent signals activate a variety of target cells to optimise the utilisation and storage of absorbed nutrients. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Application of white blood cell SPECT/CT to predict remission after a 6 or 12 week course of antibiotic treatment for diabetic foot osteomyelitis
by Julien Vouillarmet, Myriam Moret, Isabelle Morelec, Paul Michon, Julien Dubreuil

Foot osteomyelitis is a frequent condition in patients with diabetes and is associated with an increased risk of amputation. There is a wide disparity in remission rates after medical treatment alone, which may be explained by the absence of a specific marker of remission and the lack of consensus as to the optimal duration of treatment. In this issue (DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-017-4417-x), Vouillarmet et al report the results of a prospective study that investigated the remission rate of foot osteomyelitis treated medically in 45 people with diabetes, using white blood cell (WBC)-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) to guide the duration of antibiotic treatment (6 or 12 weeks). Twenty-four patients were treated for 6 weeks and 22 patients treated for 12 weeks; the overall remission rate after at least 1 year of follow-up was 84%. These results suggest that WBC-SPECT/CT may help predict remission of osteomyelitis and thereby assist in clinical decision making regarding the duration of antibiotic treatment. This article is the subject of a commentary in this issue by William J. Jeffcoate. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Transethnic insight into the genetics of glycaemic traits: fine-mapping results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) consortium
by Stephanie A. Bien, James S. Pankow, Jeffrey Haessler, Yinchang Lu, Nathan Pankratz, Rebecca R. Rohde, Alfred Tamuno, Christopher S. Carlson, Fredrick R. Schumacher, Petra Bůžková, Martha L. Daviglus, Unhee Lim, Myriam Fornage, Lindsay Fernandez-Rhodes, Larissa Avilés-Santa, Steven Buyske, Myron D. Gross, Mariaelisa Graff, Carmen R. Isasi, Lewis H. Kuller, JoAnn E. Manson, Tara C. Matise, Ross L. Prentice, Lynne R. Wilkens, Sachiko Yoneyama, Ruth J. F. Loos, Lucia A. Hindorff, Loic Le Marchand, Kari E. North, Christopher A. Haiman, Ulrike Peters, Charles Kooperberg

Genomic studies have had tremendous success identifying variants associated with type 2 diabetes and underlying biomarkers. However, these findings have been almost exclusively discovered in homogenous populations of European ancestry. In this issue, Bien et al (DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-017-4405-1) present the results of their investigation into associations between genetic variation and glycaemic traits in a multiethnic study of nearly 30,000 individuals without diabetes. Their results suggest that although the effects of glycaemic trait variants discovered in Europeans often generalise to other populations, transethnic research is imperative for a full understanding of the genetic influences. The authors report three independent variant associations in known genetic regions, of which one variant was ancestry-specific. In addition, a novel association with fasting insulin was discovered for a variant near SLC17A2. Genomic discoveries may eventually be used to inform personalised screening and therapeutic decisions. As such, these findings highlight the importance of including diverse ancestral backgrounds in future genomic studies. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Inside this issue

Up front

Up front December 2017

Position Statement

Improving the clinical value and utility of CGM systems: issues and recommendations
John R. Petrie, Anne L. Peters, Richard M. Bergenstal, Reinhard W. Holl, G. Alexander Fleming, Lutz Heinemann

Review

Exercise training response heterogeneity: physiological and molecular insights
Lauren M. Sparks

Commentary

Osteomyelitis of the foot: non-surgical management, SPECT/CT scanning and minimising the duration of antibiotic use
William J. Jeffcoate

Articles

Clinical Science and Care

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and impaired proinsulin conversion as newly identified predictors of the long-term non-response to a lifestyle intervention for diabetes prevention: results from the TULIP study
Vera Schmid, Robert Wagner, Corinna Sailer, Louise Fritsche, Konstantinos Kantartzis, Andreas Peter, Martin Heni, Hans-Ulrich Häring, Norbert Stefan, Andreas Fritsche

Increased plasma N-glycome complexity is associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes
Toma Keser, Ivan Gornik, Frano Vučković, Najda Selak, Tamara Pavić, Edita Lukić, Ivan Gudelj, Hrvoje Gašparović, Bojan Biočina, Therese Tilin, Annika Wennerström, Satu Männistö, Veikko Salomaa, Aki Havulinna, Wei Wang, James F. Wilson, Nishi Chaturvedi, Markus Perola, Harry Campbell, Gordan Lauc, Olga Gornik

Spatial distribution of early red lesions is a risk factor for development of vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy
Giovanni Ometto, Phil Assheton, Francesco Calivá, Piotr Chudzik, Bashir Al-diri, Andrew Hunter, Toke Bek

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Epidemiology

Gestational retinal microvasculature and the risk of 5 year postpartum abnormal glucose metabolism
Ling-Jun Li, Kok Hian Tan, Izzuddin M. Aris, Yap Seng Chong, Seang Mei Saw, Peter Gluckman, Jie Jin Wang, Tien Yin Wong

Termination of pregnancy and sterilisation in women with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes
Lena Sjöberg, Risto Kaaja, Mika Gissler, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Aila Tiitinen, Janne Pitkäniemi

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Genetics

Transethnic insight into the genetics of glycaemic traits: fine-mapping results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) consortium
Stephanie A. Bien, James S. Pankow, Jeffrey Haessler, Yinchang N. Lu, Nathan Pankratz, Rebecca R. Rohde, Alfred Tamuno, Christopher S. Carlson, Fredrick R. Schumacher, Petra Bůžková, Martha L. Daviglus, Unhee Lim, Myriam Fornage, Lindsay Fernandez-Rhodes, Larissa Avilés-Santa, Steven Buyske, Myron D. Gross, Mariaelisa Graff, Carmen R. Isasi, Lewis H. Kuller, JoAnn E. Manson, Tara C. Matise, Ross L. Prentice, Lynne R. Wilkens, Sachiko Yoneyama, Ruth J. F. Loos, Lucia A. Hindorff, Loic Le Marchand, Kari E. North, Christopher A. Haiman, Ulrike Peters, Charles Kooperberg

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Islet Studies

Gcg CreERT2 knockin mice as a tool for genetic manipulation in pancreatic alpha cells
Chiyo Shiota, Krishna Prasadan, Ping Guo, Joseph Fusco, Xiangwei Xiao, George K. Gittes

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Immunology and Transplantation

Differential modulation of IL-12 family cytokines in autoimmune islet graft failure in mice
Feng-Cheng Chou, Heng-Yi Chen, Hsin-Hui Chen, Gu-Jiun Lin, Shih-Hua Lin, Huey-Kang Sytwu

Multipeptide-coupled nanoparticles induce tolerance in ‘humanised’ HLA-transgenic mice and inhibit diabetogenic CD8+ T cell responses in type 1 diabetes
Xinyu Xu, Lingling Bian, Min Shen, Xin Li, Jing Zhu, Shuang Chen, Lei Xiao, Qingqing Zhang, Heng Chen, Kuanfeng Xu, Tao Yang

Metabolism

Glucose effectiveness, but not insulin sensitivity, is improved after short-term interval training in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a controlled, randomised, crossover trial
Kristian Karstoft, Margaret A. Clark, Ida Jakobsen, Sine H. Knudsen, Gerrit van Hall, Bente K. Pedersen, Thomas P. J. Solomon

KLF10 transcription factor regulates hepatic glucose metabolism in mice
Xiaoying Yang, Qi Chen, Lihong Sun, Huabing Zhang, Lu Yao, Xiaona Cui, Yong Gao, Fude Fang, Yongsheng Chang

The MST3/STK24 kinase mediates impaired fasting blood glucose after a high-fat diet
Cristina Iglesias, Ebel Floridia, Miriam Sartages, Begoña Porteiro, María Fraile, Ana Guerrero, Diana Santos, Juan Cuñarro, Sulay Tovar, Rubén Nogueiras, Celia M. Pombo, Juan Zalvide

Liver-specific reconstitution of CEACAM1 reverses the metabolic abnormalities caused by its global deletion in male mice
Lucia Russo, Harrison T. Muturi, Hilda E. Ghadieh, Simona S. Ghanem, Thomas A. Bowman, Hye Lim Noh, Sezin Dagdeviren, Godwin Y. Dogbey, Jason K. Kim, Garrett Heinrich, Sonia M. Najjar

Chylomicrons stimulate incretin secretion in mouse and human cells
Arianna Psichas, Pierre F. Larraufie, Deborah A. Goldspink, Fiona M. Gribble, Frank Reimann

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Pathophysiology and Complications

Application of white blood cell SPECT/CT to predict remission after a 6 or 12 week course of antibiotic treatment for diabetic foot osteomyelitis
Julien Vouillarmet, Myriam Moret, Isabelle Morelec, Paul Michon, Julien Dubreuil

Patterns of cutaneous nerve fibre loss and regeneration in type 2 diabetes with painful and painless polyneuropathy
Gidon J. Bönhof, Alexander Strom, Sonja Püttgen, Bernd Ringel, Jutta Brüggemann, Kálmán Bódis, Karsten Müssig, Julia Szendroedi, Michael Roden, Dan Ziegler

Assessment of glucose regulation in pregnancy after gastric bypass surgery
Christian S. Göbl, Latife Bozkurt, Andrea Tura, Michael Leutner, Laura Andrei, Lukas Fahr, Peter Husslein, Wolfgang Eppel, Alexandra Kautzky-Willer

Circulating adipokines are associated with pre-eclampsia in women with type 1 diabetes
Clare B. Kelly, Michelle B. Hookham, Jeremy Y. Yu, Samuel M. Lockhart, Mei Du, Alicia J. Jenkins, Alison Nankervis, Kristian F. Hanssen, Tore Henriksen, Satish K. Garg, Samar M. Hammad, James A. Scardo, Christopher E. Aston, Christopher C. Patterson, Timothy J. Lyons

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Research Letters

South Asian men have lower expression of IFN signalling genes in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle compared with white men
Andrea D. van Dam, Mark J. W. Hanssen, Robin van Eenige, Edwin Quinten, Hetty C. Sips, Cindy J. M. Hülsman, Ingrid M. Jazet, Wouter D. van Marken Lichtenbelt, Tom H. M. Ottenhoff, Mariëlle C. Haks, Patrick C. N. Rensen, Mariëtte R. Boon

Lower corneal nerve fibre length identifies diabetic neuropathy in older adults with diabetes: results from the Canadian Study of Longevity in Type 1 Diabetes
Daniel Scarr, Leif E. Lovblom, Julie A. Lovshin, Geneviève Boulet, Mohammed A. Farooqi, Andrej Orszag, Alanna Weisman, Nancy Cardinez, Yuliya Lytvyn, Mylan Ngo, Hillary A. Keenan, Michael H. Brent, Narinder Paul, Vera Bril, David Z. I. Cherney, Bruce A. Perkins

Letters

Europe has to step up its efforts to produce innovative and safe diabetes technology
Miriam Cnop, Tomasz Klupa, Nikolaos Tentolouris, Anna Novials, Rémy Burcelin, Mischa van Eimeren

Bladder cancer in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial
Sven Kohler, Jisoo Lee, Jyothis T. George, Silvio E. Inzucchi, Bernard Zinman

SGLT2 inhibitors and cancer: why further evidence is required
Altamash M. Y. Shaikh

Cancer risk in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial. Reply to Shaikh AMY [letter] and Kohler S, Lee J, George JT et al [letter]
Huilin Tang, Jiali Han, Yiqing Song

Errata

Erratum to: Understanding and preventing type 1 diabetes through the unique working model of TrialNet
Manuela Battaglia, Mark S. Anderson, Jane H. Buckner, Susan M. Geyer, Peter A. Gottlieb, Thomas W. H. Kay, Åke Lernmark, Sarah Muller, Alberto Pugliese, Bart O. Roep, Carla J. Greenbaum, Mark Peakman

Erratum to: Innovative technology shows impact of glycaemic control on peripheral retinal vessels in adolescents with type 1 diabetes
Valli Velayutham, Paul Z. Benitez-Aguirre, Maria E. Craig, Gerald Liew, Tien Y. Wong, Alicia J. Jenkins, Kim C. Donaghue

Correction to: Transethnic insight into the genetics of glycaemic traits: fine-mapping results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) consortium
Stephanie A. Bien, James S. Pankow, Jeffrey Haessler, Yinchang Lu, Nathan Pankratz, Rebecca R. Rohde, Alfred Tamuno, Christopher S. Carlson, Fredrick R. Schumacher, Petra Bůžková, Martha L. Daviglus, Unhee Lim, Myriam Fornage, Lindsay Fernandez-Rhodes, Larissa Avilés-Santa, Steven Buyske, Myron D. Gross, Mariaelisa Graff, Carmen R. Isasi, Lewis H. Kuller, JoAnn E. Manson, Tara C. Matise, Ross L. Prentice, Lynne R. Wilkens, Sachiko Yoneyama, Ruth J. F. Loos, Lucia A. Hindorff, Loic Le Marchand, Kari E. North, Christopher A. Haiman, Ulrike Peters, Charles Kooperberg

Correction to: Islet-intrinsic effects of CFTR mutation
Fiona N. Manderson Koivula, Neville H. McClenaghan, Alan G. S. Harper, Catriona Kelly

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