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Welcome to Diabetologia

Diabetologia publishes original clinical and experimental research within the field of diabetes. We are interested in papers that convey new information or insight into any aspect of the condition, ranging from basic science to clinical applications. These are judged in terms of their scientific quality, novelty, relevance and interest to our broadly based readership.

Statement of Principle

EASD releases joint Statement of Principle with ADA, AACE and TES (November 2014)

In the News

People with blood groups A, B and AB at higher risk of type 2 diabetes than group O

Download this new research by Dr Guy Fagherazzi and Dr Françoise Clavel-Chapelon, Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM, Villejuif, France, and colleagues.
For further information contact Dr Fagherazzi (Guy.FAGHERAZZI@gustaveroussy.fr) or Dr Clavel-Chapelon (francoise.clavel@gustaveroussy.fr).


(posted online 22.01 h GMT Thursday 18 December 2014)

No link found between bladder cancer and use of pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (Avandia)

Download this new research by Dr Samira Bell, Professor Helen Colhoun and Mr Danny Levin, University of Dundee, UK, and colleagues from the International Diabetes and Cancer Research Collaboration.
For further information contact Roddy Isles, University of Dundee Press Office (R.Isles@dundee.ac.uk).


(posted online 22.01 h GMT Wednesday 3 December 2014)

Current issue: January 2015

January 2015 cover

Click here to view this month's contents

The cover picture shows a coloured transmission electron micrograph of a section through skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance to glucose uptake by skeletal muscle is a key defect in type 2 diabetes, but exercise is able to stimulate muscle glucose disposal, even in insulin-resistant individuals. Two paralogue Rab GTPase activating proteins known as TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 were recently identified as signalling proteins that regulate glucose transport and are responsive to both insulin and exercise. In the present issue of Diabetologia, Gregory D. Cartee reviews current understanding of the roles of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle.
Cover credit: SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

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Up front

Juleen Zierath

Competition for publication in Diabetologia is greater than ever, and less than 20% of papers are accepted. Of all the high-quality papers that appear in this month's issue I want to share with you five articles that I find to be of particular interest. These will be featured 'up front' in the print issue and here on our website. Juleen R. Zierath, Editor


Roles of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose transport of skeletal muscle
by Gregory D. Cartee

In this issue, Gregory D. Cartee reviews research on two paralogue Rab GTPase activating proteins known as TBC1D1 and TBC1D4, which have been identified as regulators of muscle glucose transport in response to insulin and exercise, the two major physiological stimuli for skeletal muscle glucose transport. TBC1D4 phosphorylation is instrumental for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle. This does not appear to be the case for TBC1D1, which is implicated in the insulin-independent mechanism for elevated glucose uptake in response to exercise. Greater phosphorylation of TBC1D4, but not TBC1D1, often tracks closely with enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport several hours after one exercise session, although a causal link between elevated TBC1D4 phosphorylation and improved insulin sensitivity remains to be established. Overall, the findings indicate that TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 have crucial, but distinct, roles in regulating muscle glucose transport in response to insulin and exercise. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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The effect of glibenclamide on insulin secretion at normal glucose concentrations
by Axel Riefflin, Usha Ayyagari, Susan E. Manley, Rury R. Holman, Jonathan C. Levy

Sulfonylureas, long regarded as first- or second-line glucose-lowering agents because of their efficacy and low cost, also have well-known adverse effects including weight gain and hypoglycaemia. These drugs trigger insulin secretion by inhibiting the KATP channel, but their impact on insulin secretion at low-normal glucose concentrations in people with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. In this issue, Riefflin et al report that glibenclamide increases insulin secretion by a similar increment whether blood glucose is fixed at a low, medium or high level, meaning that the proportional increase at low-normal glucose is considerably greater than at higher glucose levels. This evidence of a disproportionate increase in insulin secretion at low glucose highlights the potentially enhanced risk of hypoglycaemia when aiming for tight glucose control using sulfonylurea therapy. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Sulfonylurea in combination with insulin is associated with increased mortality compared with a combination of insulin and metformin in a retrospective Danish nationwide study
by Ulrik M. Mogensen, Charlotte Andersson, Emil L. Fosbøl, Tina K. Schramm, Allan Vaag, Nikolai M. Scheller, Christian Torp-Pedersen, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber

Mogensen et al report in this issue that treatment with sulfonylurea in conjunction with insulin, compared with metformin and insulin, is associated with more frequent episodes of hypoglycaemia and greater risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death. However, available information on hypoglycaemic episodes did not seem to explain the increased risk associated with use of sulfonylurea+insulin. These findings suggest that users of sulfonylurea+insulin have a greater risk of hypoglycaemia, mortality and cardiovascular events and highlight the need for further studies on combinations of glucose-lowering therapy and the risk of hypoglycaemia and mortality. This article is the subject of a commentary in this issue by Jeffrey A. Johnson. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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The adverse association of diabetes with risk of first acute myocardial infarction is modified by physical activity and body mass index: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway
by Børge Moe, Liv B. Augestad, W. Dana Flanders, Håvard Dalen, Tom I. L Nilsen

Diabetes is associated with a twofold increased risk of a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The extent to which engaging in physical activity and maintaining a normal body weight can compensate for this greater risk is unknown. In this issue, Moe et al provide evidence that people with diabetes who reported a high physical activity level had a similar risk of a first AMI as inactive people without diabetes. A normal body weight was also associated with lower risk of a first AMI, particularly when combined with moderate or high physical activity. The results highlight the importance of physical activity and weight maintenance as effective means for primary prevention of AMI among people with diabetes. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Vascular heterogeneity between native rat pancreatic islets is responsible for differences in survival and revascularisation post transplantation
by Sara Ullsten, Joey Lau, Per-Ola Carlsson

Differences in islet vascular support have previously been suggested as providing a bench-mark that reflects islet functionality. This heterogeneity among pancreatic islets has not been fully considered in the outcome of islet transplantation. In this issue, Ullsten et al report that the subpopulation of most active islets in the native pancreas (i.e. the most highly blood-perfused) is more susceptible to cellular death when exposed to cytokines and hypoxia, and also has a higher cellular death rate early after transplantation, although surviving islets in this population were much better engrafted than other islets. These findings indicate the importance of developing efficient interventions against cell death in the early stages following transplantation, since the most functionally active islets preferentially die at this stage. This article is the subject of a commentary in this issue by Peter In't Veld and Eckhard Lammert. [Text supplied by the authors.]

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Inside this issue

Commentaries

The safety of sulfonylurea therapy in type 2 diabetes: have we reached the practical limits of our evidence base?
Jeffrey A. Johnson

The dark side of islet vasculature
Peter In’t Veld, Eckhard Lammert

The sparing use of fat: G0s2 controls lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation
Christoph Heier, Robert Zimmermann

For Debate

The time has come to test the beta cell preserving effects of exercise in patients with new onset type 1 diabetes
Parth Narendran, Thomas P. Solomon, Amy Kennedy, Myriam Chimen, Rob C. Andrews

Reviews

Roles of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose transport of skeletal muscle
Gregory D. Cartee

SLC30A8 mutations in type 2 diabetes
Guy A. Rutter, Fabrice Chimienti

Obesity, diabetes and cancer: insight into the relationship from a cohort with growth hormone receptor deficiency
Jaime Guevara-Aguirre, Arlan L. Rosenbloom


Articles

Clinical Science and Care

The effect of glibenclamide on insulin secretion at normal glucose concentrations
Axel Riefflin, Usha Ayyagari, Susan E. Manley, Rury R. Holman, Jonathan C. Levy

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Epidemiology

Sulfonylurea in combination with insulin is associated with increased mortality compared with a combination of insulin and metformin in a retrospective Danish nationwide study
Ulrik M. Mogensen, Charlotte Andersson, Emil L. Fosbøl, Tina K. Schramm, Allan Vaag, Nikolai M. Scheller, Christian Torp-Pedersen, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber

The adverse association of diabetes with risk of first acute myocardial infarction is modified by physical activity and body mass index: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway
Børge Moe, Liv B. Augestad, W. Dana Flanders, Håvard Dalen, Tom I. L Nilsen

The long-term effects of stillbirth on women with and without gestational diabetes: a population-based cohort study
Basilio Pintaudi, Giuseppe Lucisano, Fabio Pellegrini, Antonio D’Ettorre, Vito Lepore, Giorgia De Berardis, Marco Scardapane, Giacoma Di Vieste, Maria Chiara Rossi, Michele Sacco, Gianni Tognoni, Antonio Nicolucci

Cord blood insulinoma-associated protein 2 autoantibodies are associated with increased risk of type 1 diabetes in the population-based Diabetes Prediction in Skåne study
Short Communication
Markus Lundgren, Kristian Lynch, Christer Larsson, Helena Elding Larsson, for the Diabetes Prediction in Skåne study group

Enterovirus infection is associated with an increased risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in Taiwan: a nationwide population-based cohort study
Hsiao-Chuan Lin, Chung-Hsing Wang, Fuu-Jen Tsai, Kao-Pin Hwang, Walter Chen, Cheng-Chieh Lin, Tsai-Chung Li

Modelling of OGTT curve identifies 1 h plasma glucose level as a strong predictor of incident type 2 diabetes: results from two prospective cohorts
Akram Alyass, Peter Almgren, Mikael Akerlund, Jonathan Dushoff, Bo Isomaa, Peter Nilsson, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Valeriya Lyssenko, Leif Groop, David Meyre

A priori-defined diet quality indexes and risk of type 2 diabetes: the Multiethnic Cohort
Simone Jacobs, Brook E. Harmon, Carol J. Boushey, Yukiko Morimoto, Lynne R. Wilkens, Loic Le Marchand, Janine Kröger, Matthias B. Schulze, Laurence N. Kolonel, Gertraud Maskarinec

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Islet Studies

Inhibition of NADPH oxidase-1 preserves beta cell function
Jessica R. Weaver, Wojciech Grzesik, David A. Taylor-Fishwick

Pancreatic T cell protein–tyrosine phosphatase deficiency affects beta cell function in mice
Yannan Xi, Siming Liu, Ahmed Bettaieb, Kosuke Matsuo, Izumi Matsuo, Ellen Hosein, Samah Chahed, Florian Wiede, Sheng Zhang, Zhong-Yin Zhang, Rohit N. Kulkarni, Tony Tiganis, Fawaz G. Haj

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Immunology and Transplantation

Vascular heterogeneity between native rat pancreatic islets is responsible for differences in survival and revascularisation post transplantation
Sara Ullsten, Joey Lau, Per-Ola Carlsson

Autoreactive T cells induce necrosis and not BCL-2-regulated or death receptor-mediated apoptosis or RIPK3-dependent necroptosis of transplanted islets in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes
Yuxing Zhao, Nicholas A. Scott, Stacey Fynch, Lorraine Elkerbout, W. Wei-Lynn Wong, Kylie D. Mason, Andreas Strasser, David C. Huang, Thomas W. H. Kay, Helen E. Thomas

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Metabolism

Deletion of the gene encoding G0/G1 switch protein 2 (G0s2) alleviates high-fat-diet-induced weight gain and insulin resistance, and promotes browning of white adipose tissue in mice
Wissal El-Assaad, Karim El-Kouhen, Amro H. Mohammad, Jieyi Yang, Masahiro Morita, Isabelle Gamache, Orval Mamer, Daina Avizonis, Nicole Hermance, Sander Kersten, Michel L. Tremblay, Michelle A. Kelliher, Jose G. Teodoro

Enhanced fatty acid uptake in visceral adipose tissue is not reversed by weight loss in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome
Marco Bucci, Anna C. Karmi, Patricia Iozzo, Barbara A. Fielding, Antti Viljanen, Robert M. Badeau, Ronald Borra, Virva Saunavaara, Tam Pham, Jarna C. Hannukainen, Kari Kalliokoski, Merja Haaparanta-Solin, Tapio Viljanen, Riitta Parkkola, Keith N. Frayn, Pirjo Nuutila

Middle-aged overweight South Asian men exhibit a different metabolic adaptation to short-term energy restriction compared with Europeans
Leontine E. H. Bakker, Bruno Guigas, Linda D. van Schinkel, Gerard C. M. van der Zon, Trea C. M. Streefland, Jan B. van Klinken, Jacqueline T. Jonker, Hildo J. Lamb, Johannes W. A. Smit, Hanno Pijl, A. Edo Meinders, Ingrid M. Jazet

Metabolic response to 36 hours of fasting in young men born small vs appropriate for gestational age
Sine W. Jørgensen, Charlotte Brøns, Les Bluck, Line Hjort, Kristine Færch, Ajay Thankamony, Linn Gillberg, Martin Friedrichsen, David B. Dunger, Allan A. Vaag

Pathophysiology and Complications

Association of urinary KIM-1, L-FABP, NAG and NGAL with incident end-stage renal disease and mortality in American Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus
Gudeta D. Fufaa, E. Jennifer Weil, Robert G. Nelson, Robert L. Hanson, Joseph V. Bonventre, Venkata Sabbisetti, Sushrut S. Waikar, Theodore E. Mifflin, Xiaoming Zhang, Dawei Xie, Chi-yuan Hsu, Harold I. Feldman, Josef Coresh, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Paul L. Kimmel, Kathleen D. Liu, for the Chronic Kidney Disease Biomarkers Consortium Investigators

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Letters

Coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes
Paolo Palatini

Linking prediabetes and cancer: a complex issue
Dario Giugliano, Maria Ida Maiorino, Katherine Esposito

Retraction Note

Retraction Note: Abstracts of the 47th Annual Meeting of the EASD, Lisbon 2011. ‘Reduced syntaxin-5 in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes is linked to increased diacylglycerol, activation of PKCtheta and impaired insulin signalling’
K. Højlund, P. Boström, B. F. Vind, L. Andersson, S. Myhre, M. Ståhlman, H. Beck-Nielsen, J. Borén, S.-O. Olofsson

Errata

Erratum to: Metabolic response to 36 hours of fasting in young men born small vs appropriate for gestational age
Sine W. Jørgensen, Charlotte Brøns, Les Bluck, Line Hjort, Kristine Færch, Ajay Thankamony, Linn Gillberg, Martin Friedrichsen, David B. Dunger, Allan A. Vaag

Erratum to: Eating two larger meals a day (breakfast and lunch) is more effective than six smaller meals in a reduced-energy regimen for patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised crossover study
Hana Kahleova, Lenka Belinova, Hana Malinska, Olena Oliyarnyk, Jaroslava Trnovska, Vojtech Skop, Ludmila Kazdova, Monika Dezortova, Milan Hajek, Andrea Tura, Martin Hill, Terezie Pelikanova

Erratum to: Feature ranking of type 1 diabetes susceptibility genes improves prediction of type 1 diabetes
Christiane Winkler, Jan Krumsiek, Florian Buettner, Christof Angermüller, Eleni Z. Giannopoulou, Fabian J. Theis, Anette-Gabriele Ziegler, Ezio Bonifacio

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